Chocolate Peppermint Crinkle Cookies – Spicy Southern Kitchen

Chocolate Peppermint Crinkle Cookies – Spicy Southern Kitchen

Chocolate Peppermint Crinkle Cookies are wonderfully chocolaty with some peppermint flavor. One of my favorite Christmas cookies and they are so easy to make. A great recipe for the novice baker.

Chocolate Peppermint Crinkle Cookies on baking sheet.

The cookie dough can be made up to 5 days in advance and then it only takes 10 minutes to bake.

Ingredients Needed

  • Unsweetened Chocolate– I use Baker’s Unsweetened Chocolate.
  • Butter– I use salted.
  • Granulated Sugar
  • Peppermint Extract
  • Eggs
  • All-Purpose Flour
  • Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
  • Baking Powder– be sure it is fresh.
  • Powdered Sugar
Cookies on baking sheet and on plate.

How To Make Chocolate Peppermint Crinkle Cookies

More detailed instructions below.

  1. Melt the butter and chocolate in the microwave. Let cool.
  2. Stir in the granulated sugar, peppermint extract, and eggs.
  3. In a separate bowl whisk together flour, cocoa powder, and baking powder. Stir into egg mixture.
  4. Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours.
  5. Roll into balls, coat in powdered sugar and bake for 10 minutes. They will not spread much so you can place them fairly close together.
Cookie dough getting rolled into balls.

Make In Advance

The cookie dough needs to be refrigerated for at least 2 hours so this is a great make-ahead recipe for the busy holiday season. The cookie dough can be made up to 5 days in advance. Just be sure to wrap it well so it doesn’t dry out.

Why Chill The Dough

Chilling the dough serves two purposes. It makes the dough easier to roll into balls because it isn’t as sticky and it helps lessen the amount the cookies spread out, creating thicker cookies.

Chocolate cookies on a plate.

Kitchen Tools I Use

No Mixer Needed!

  • Mixing Bowls– I love this set of nesting mixing bowls.
  • Parchment Paper
  • Rimmed Baking Sheets– these rimmed baking sheets are also great for roasting vegetables.
  • 1 1/2-inch Cookie Scoop– a cookie scoop helps quickly and evenly shape the cookies. If you don’t have one, just use a spoon.

How To Store

Can be kept at room temperature in an airtight container for 5 days or they can be refrigerated for a little over a week. Can be frozen for up to 2 months.

Recipe Tip

For best flavor use pure extracts and not imitation.

Don’t Overbake

The cookies should be cracked on top but still a little soft in the middle.

These cookies are sure to become a holiday favorite.

Chocolate Peppermint Crinkle Cookies on baking sheet.

More Christmas Cookie Recipes

  • Place chopped chocolate, butter, and salt in a large microwave-safe bowl. Microwave at 30 second intervals, stirring after each one, until melted.Let cool some.
  • Stir in sugar, peppemint extract, and eggs.

  • In a small bowl stir together flour, unsweetened cocoa powder, and baking powder.

  • Stir flour mixture into egg mixture. Cover tightly with plastic wrap.

  • Refrigerate at least 2 hours and up to 5 days.

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

  • Use a 1½-inch cookie scoop to scoop dough. Roll into balls.Place powdered sugar in a small bowl. Roll dough balls in powdered sugar and then place on prepared baking sheets.
  • Bake for 10 minutes.

If you don’t have a cookie scoop, just use a spoon for the batter.
Nutritional info is provided as an estimate only and will vary based on brands of products used.

Calories: 141kcal | Carbohydrates: 26g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 4g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.3g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Trans Fat: 0.1g | Cholesterol: 27mg | Sodium: 84mg | Potassium: 66mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 20g | Vitamin A: 77IU | Calcium: 25mg | Iron: 1mg

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